Tribal Knowledge: Playing with a Stranger’s Toys

DriveThruRPG, the DM’s Guild, and the gaming blogosphere are just the newest sources of the huge wealth of setting material that has been published for D&D, to say nothing of WotC’s extraordinarily deep catalog of content. In this article, I’m talking about the challenges of using someone else’s content, whether we’re talking about adventures or whole settings.

Tales of the Lance: The Dragonlance Nexus

Shawn: Dragonlance was the setting that really pulled me into D&D way back in the 80s, so I love all things Krynn. This week I’m taking a break from my Campaign Trail column to bring you a guest post from Trampas “Dragonhelm” Whiteman, looking at the history of the ENnie award winning Dragonlance Nexus and Dragonlance fandom. Take it away Trampas…

Sometimes, a story has an epic beginning. Sometimes, it’s fate. And sometimes…just sometimes…it’s sheer dumb luck, being at the right place at the right time, and having a whole lot of gumption. It was the latter that spawned the Dragonlance Nexus.

Brothers Majere: The Dragonlance Book with Lich Sex

When I wrote about Lord Toede ages ago, I shared what I considered one of the more obscure and outlandish books in the Dragonlance novel library. In talking with some friends, I realized that while it was certainly bizarre, I totally forgot about a book from the Dragonlance Preludes series, Brothers Majere by Kevin Stein.

Dragonlance is a weird setting. It has many things we have come to consider Dungeons and Dragons staples, but it maintains a decidedly low-level approach to most of its content and characterizations.There is a specific style to Dragonlance established in the primary novels and source material. These provide a sense of consistency and a thematic throughline for the setting. This is particularly important when the core team spins off the work into the hands of other authors and designers. Usually, such style guides are referred to as a setting bible.

Dragonlance in 5th Edition – Player Options

Last week on the Campaign Trail I looked at what support is available to run a Dragonlance campaign in fifth edition. Since launch, Wizards of the Coast has been very focused on supporting storylines set in the Forgotten Realms. For those of us hoping to see official support for Dragonlance or another setting, we have been only provided with limited resources. I’ve been doing an inventory of what I would need to run a Dragonlance campaign using 5th edition rules and it looks like everything needed is out there, you just have to know where to look. He’s my collection of resources you and your players will need to create heroes for a D&D 5th edition game set in Dragonlance’s world of Krynn.

Dragonlance in 5th Edition – Campaign World & Adventures

This week on the Campaign Trail I wanted to take a look at what support is available to run the Dragonlance saga in Fifth Edition. Since the launch of D&D 5e, Wizards of the Coast has been very focused on supporting D&D storylines set in the Forgotten Realms. For those of us hoping to see official support for Dragonlance or another setting, we have only been provided with limited resources. I’ve been doing an inventory of what I would need to run a Dragonlance campaign using 5th edition rules and it looks like everything needed is out there, you just have to know where to look. People are playing Dragonlance campaigns using 5th edition rules, but for those of us on the sidelines, here’s my collection of annotated resources to get you started running adventures in Krynn.

Prestige Class: Dragonlance’s Solamnic Knight of the Crown

Prestige classes were introduced in third edition as a further means of individualizing a character. This month’s Unearthered Arcana article introduced playtest material for us to create Prestige Classes for D&D 5th Edition. I thought that testing out the creation of Dragonlance’s Solamnic Knight of the Crown as a prestige class would be a good way to try out this player option.

Kender for D&D 5th Edition: A Reluctant Test of Design

I’m am confident there are players in the world who know how to bring kender into a game and make that game more fun and interesting for everyone. I haven’t met them [EDIT 9/20/15: I’ve now met one. Senda from the She’s a Super Geek podcast happily spoke of her love for kender on Jim McClure’s brilliant Talking TableTop, and after spending time talking to her I would happily welcome her kender at my table]. I love Tasselhoff in novels, but at the table I find the kender’s natural strengths are used more to mess with other players than support the group story. With that in mind, I attempted to use interesting mechanics to support the flavor of the kender’s fun and entertaining traits without forcing players to outright steal every chance they get.

D&D Upcoming Storyline Predictions – Revised

Way back in November 2014, I made some predictions on upcoming storylines between now and 2018. I predicted that they would do an Underdark storyline… but I was way off thinking it would come out in 2018. As we have learned more about the two storylines a year that will be coming out each year, here are my revised “predictions”, but I would say that this is wild guesses at this point.

Unearthed Arcana: Character Options for a High Seas Campaign

As some of you might know, I run a waterborne campaign of my own in my Vodari setting. In the latest Unearthed Arcana, Mike Mearls has provided some great options for your seafaring adventures. I actually set-up Minotaurs and Swashbucklers for my campaign… but this take is great and my Swashbuckler was clearly inferior. The Mariner fighting style and Storm Sorcerer are great player options for a waterborne campaign too.