Archfey Patrons, Part Three

I am distressed to discover that it has been almost two months since I wrote the last article in this series. It has been a very busy time, and here we are again. This time, I’m offering custom features for the Mother of Redcaps, the Dream-Tyrant, the Winter Lord, the Muse of Steel, and the Eldest. Even more than the previous articles, not all patron archetypes are right for every setting’s version of the fey. On the other hand, Archfey (like any cosmically-powerful entity) get shoved into itty-bitty living space all the frickin’ time, so if you’re going along in a campaign and suddenly realize that one of the more obscure Archfey would be great to introduce right now, it’s easily done.

Archfey Patrons, Part Two

Last time in my series on the fey, I proposed unique features for other Archfey patrons. I’m describing the Archfey in terms of archetypes rather than names, since WotC has one set of names for them, real-world myth has another, and my own setting has still different names. The first article covered the Seelie Queen, the Queen of Air and Darkness, the Silver Knight, the Lord of the Hunt, and the Good Fellow. This time, I have a rather intimidating list of Archfey I want to cover… and now that I’ve done four of them I realize that I need to just let there be a third article of Archfey patrons.

Fey Huntsmen and Leashed Terrors

A few weeks ago, I wrote about fey knights and the general dearth of worthy fey opponents in the 5e Monster Manual. This week, I present the fey huntsmen that lead the Wild Hunt and their beasts, the leashed terrors. If you need a foundation in the mythology of the Wild Hunt, Wikipedia is here for you. I’m going beyond the core of that myth to propose game-able goals for the Wild Hunt and Archfey that might control them. Because of the themes of fear and death, I’m mostly associating the Wild Hunt with the Unseelie or Winter Court, but in other settings I’ve seen it presented as something closer to an independent force of nature, separate from the Courts.

Fey Chivalry

In the 5e Monster Manual, we find many of D&D’s traditional fey – pixies, satyrs, and sprites, among others. This… falls a little short of both the variety and threat level I would like to see for the fey. I mean, the Archfey are potent on a level with the Nine and the Great Old Ones, judging by their significance as warlock patrons. This article, which might become a series, introduces a variety of higher-ranking fey creatures. There is also a knightly order (intended to be one among several) for those who serve the Archfey. This is going to become real obvious, real fast, but: I love me some Changeling (Dreaming, Lost – both awesome.)

Fey Knight

Fey knights wander the Feywild, the Material Plane, and other places as they undertake quests for their lords, the Archfey. When not traveling, they defend their lord’s palace, or the halls of their lord’s vassals.

Pride drives fey knights to seek glory in battle; they rarely refuse any challenge that they have any hope of succeeding. They are the flower of fey chivalry, punctilious in manners and exquisitely refined in bearing.

Fey knights are quite similar to high elves in appearance, but with an otherworldly sheen to their skin and a palpable aura of majesty that few high elves can match.

Ideas for a Fairy Tale Campaign Setting

This week on the Campaign Trail I’m continuing to look at campaign settings that go beyond the typical fantasy worlds most of us play in each week. In each article in the series I’ll provide notes on running a campaign (or adventure) in a campaign setting inspired by less typical D&D settings and genres such as lost world, steampunk, ancient mythology, pirates, gun fu, sci-fi, wild west and more. My weekly game in the Seas of Vodari has my players slowly progressing towards a forest covered island, where I’m sure they’ll encounter some fairies and other Fey. I thought that this week we could look at Ideas for a Fairy Tale Campaign Setting. I’m not referring to a trip to the Feywild, but actual storybook fairy tales like we see in movies such as Frozen, Tangled, Maleficent, Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters and Snow White and the Huntsman.